Senate Is Planning To Return To Session Despite Coronavirus Fears In Washington

May 1, 2020 - 4:14pm EDT
Photo Credit / Getty Images / AGGP

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is planning to start a Senate session next week even though Washington, D.C., remains a coronavirus hotspot. The House is not returning to the capital yet.

Mar 3 - 5:03am EST

The lies about voting machine company Dominion are having real world impact. One Ohio county stalled a contract to buy voting machines after hearing from constituents riled up by the false claims.

Mar 3 - 5:03am EST

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is lifting all COVID-19 restrictions in his state. That's leading to worries about the virus spreading before most Texas can be vaccinated.

Mar 3 - 5:03am EST

President Biden's nominee to lead the Office of Management and Budget has withdrawn from the proceedings. Key Democratic and Republican senators refused to back Neera Tanden.

Mar 3 - 5:00am EST

The Senate Rules and Homeland Security committees will hear from top military officials on their role in the insurrection. This, as a House panel weighs new Capitol security spending.

Mar 3 - 5:00am EST

Democrats and Republicans can agree to very little about the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, including how to investigate it. The fallout is impacting the ability to work across party lines.

Mar 2 - 8:15pm EST

Neera Tanden has withdrawn her nomination to lead the Office of Management and Budget, the first big loss for the Biden administration in Congress.

Mar 2 - 6:53pm EST

In the wake of the historic 2020 election turnout, state legislatures across the U.S. are considering bills to make it harder to vote. Activist Stacey Abrams warns of a return to Jim Crow-era laws.

Mar 2 - 6:51pm EST

The former head of the Center for American Progress was criticized for tweets disparaging some lawmakers. President Biden said in a statement he accepted Tanden's request.

Mar 2 - 6:03pm EST

Biden's picks to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Securities and Exchange Commission signaled in a Senate hearing they'd be tougher cops on the beat than their Trump era predecessors